Choose Help The Kavli Prize

EurekAlert!, a service of AAAS
Home About us
Advanced Search
24-Oct-2014 03:45
US Eastern Time

Username:

Password:

Register

Forgot Password?

Press Releases

Breaking News

Science Business

Grants, Awards, Books

Meetings

Multimedia

Science Agencies
on EurekAlert!

US Department of Energy

US National Institutes of Health

US National Science Foundation

Calendar

Submit a Calendar Item

Subscribe/Sponsor

Links & Resources

Portals

RSS Feeds

Accessibility Option On

Breaking News
US Department of Energy
US National Institutes of Health
US National Science Foundation


Arabic

Breaking News

Titles Only 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 445.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
For brain hemorrhage, risk of death is lower at high-volume hospitals
For patients with a severe type of stroke called subarachnoid hemorrhage, treatment at a hospital that treats a high volume of subarachnoid hemorrhage cases is associated with a lower risk of death, reports a study in the November issue of Neurosurgery, official journal of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons. The journal is published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, a part of Wolters Kluwer Health.

Contact: Connie Hughes
Connie.Hughes@wolterskluwer.com
646-674-6348
Wolters Kluwer Health

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
IARU Sustainability Science Congress
Global boom in hydropower expected this decade
An unprecedented boom in hydropower dam construction is underway, primarily in developing countries and emerging economies. While this is expected to double the global electricity production from hydropower, it could reduce the number of our last remaining large free-flowing rivers by about 20 percent and pose a serious threat to freshwater biodiversity.

Contact: Elisabeth Wulffeld
elisabethw@snm.ku.dk
45-21-17-91-40
Faculty of Science - University of Copenhagen

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Journal of Environmental Psychology
Nation's 'personality' influences its environmental stewardship, shows new study
Countries with higher levels of compassion and openness score better when it comes to environmental sustainability, says research from the University of Toronto.
Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council

Contact: Ken McGuffin
mcguffin@rotman.utoronto.ca
University of Toronto, Rotman School of Management

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
NASA HS3 mission Global Hawk's bullseye in Hurricane Edouard
NASA's Hurricane Severe Storms Sentinel or HS3 mission flew the unmanned Global Hawk aircraft on two missions between Sept. 11 and 15 into Hurricane Edouard and scored a bullseye by gathering information in the eye of the strengthening storm. Scientists saw how upper-level wind shear was affecting Edouard on the HS3's Global Hawk flight of the 2014 campaign over Sept. 11 and 12, and saw the hurricane strengthen during the sixth flight on Sept. 15 and 16.
NASA, NOAA

Contact: Rob Gutro
Robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
301-286-4044
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Journal of Medical Screening
Screening questions fail to identify teens at risk for hearing loss
Subjective screening questions do not reliably identify teenagers who are at risk for hearing loss, according to researchers at Penn State College of Medicine. The results suggest that objective hearing tests should be refined for this age group to replace screening questions.
Academic Pediatric Association

Contact: Matt Solovey
msolovey@hmc.psu.edu
717-531-8606
Penn State

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
PLOS ONE
Bodies at sea: Ocean oxygen levels may impact scavenger response
An ocean's oxygen levels may play a role in the impact of marine predators on bodies when they are immersed in the sea, according to Simon Fraser University researchers, who deployed a trio of pig carcasses into Saanich Inlet off Vancouver Island and studied them using an underwater camera via the internet.
Canadian Police Research Centre

Contact: Gail Anderson
ganderso@sfu.ca
778-782-3589
Simon Fraser University

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Gastrointestinal Endoscopy
An over-the-scope clipping device for endoscopic management of gastrointestinal defects is safe and effective
A new study reports that over-the-scope clip placement is a safe and effective therapy for the closure of gastrointestinal defects such as anastomotic leaks, fistulae and perforations. Clinical success was best achieved in patients undergoing closure of perforations or leaks when over-the-scope clip placement was used for primary or rescue therapy. Overall clinical success for closure of perforations and leaks ranged between 90 percent and 73 percent; successful closure of fistulae was achieved in less than half of patients.

Contact: Anne Brownsey
abrownsey@asge.org
630-570-5635
American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Cell
Synthetic biology on ordinary paper, results off the page
Two breakthroughs clenched by Wyss scientists, paper–based synthetic gene networks and toehold switch gene regulators, could each have revolutionary impacts on synthetic biology: the former brings synthetic biology out of the traditional confinement of a living cell, the latter provides a rational design framework to enable de-novo design of both the parts and the network of gene regulation

Contact: Kat J. McAlpine
katherine.mcalpine@wyss.harvard.edu
617-432-8266
Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Clinical Cancer Research
Dartmouth study measures breast cancer tumor response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy
A Dartmouth study suggests that it may be possible to use Diffuse Optical Spectroscopic Tomographic imaging to predict which patients will best respond to chemotherapy used to shrink breast cancer tumors before surgery. These findings could eliminate delays in effective early treatment for tumors unlikely to respond to neoadjuvant chemotherapy.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Robin Dutcher
Robin.Dutcher@hitchcock.org
603-653-9056
The Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Journal of Thoracic Oncology
Novel software application can stratify early-stage non-small cell lung cancer patients
Computer-Aided Nodule Assessment and Risk Yield, is a novel software tool developed at Mayo Clinic that can automatically quantitate adenocarcinoma pulmonary nodule characteristics from non-invasive high resolution computed tomography images and stratify non-small cell lung cancer patients into risk groups that have significantly different disease-free survival outcome

Contact: Rob mansheim
rob.mansheim@iaslc.org
720-325-2952
International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Journal of Thoracic Oncology
European multicenter harmonization study shows anaplastic lymphoma kinase immunohistochemistry testing comparable to, if not better than, fluorescence in situ hybridization testing
Sixteen institutions across Europe collaborated together to show for the first time that a semi-quantitative anaplastic lymphoma kinase protein expression test, immunohistochemistry, is reliable amongst several laboratories and reviewers when test methodology and result interpretation are strictly standardized and the scoring pathologists are appropriately trained on the test.

Contact: Rob Mansheim
rob.mansheim@iaslc.org
720-325-2952
International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Cell Metabolism
UT Southwestern scientists discover new clues to how weight loss is regulated
A hormone seen as a popular target to develop weight-loss drugs works by directly targeting the brain and triggering previously unknown activity in the nervous system, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center obesity researchers have found.

Contact: Russell Rian
russell.rian@utsouthwestern.edu
214-648-3404
UT Southwestern Medical Center

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Geology
Desert streams: Deceptively simple
Volatile rainstorms drive complex landscape changes in deserts, particularly in dryland channels, which are shaped by flash flooding. Paradoxically, such desert streams have surprisingly simple topography with smooth, straight and symmetrical form that until now has defied explanation.

Contact: Julie Cohen
julie.cohen@ucsb.edu
805-893-7220
University of California - Santa Barbara

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Cell Reports
Experimental breast cancer drug holds promise in combination therapy for Ewing sarcoma
Ewing sarcoma tumors disappeared and did not return in more than 70 percent of mice treated with combination therapy that included drugs from a family of experimental agents developed to fight breast cancer, reported St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, Alex's Lemonade Stand Foundation for Childhood Cancer, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Tully Family Foundation, ALSAC

Contact: Summer Freeman
summer.freeman@stjude.org
901-595-3061
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Diabetes
Study finds significant increase in type 1 diabetes rates among non-Hispanic white youth
The rate of non-Hispanic white youth diagnosed with type 1 diabetes increased significantly from 2002 to 2009 in all but the youngest age group of children, according to a new study published today in the journal Diabetes.

Contact: Vincent Staupe
vstaupe@golin.com
415-318-4386
Kaiser Permanente

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
HortTechnology
Helping sweet cherries survive the long haul
Research into the effectiveness of hydrocooling of sweet cherries at commercial packing houses determined the need for post-packing cooling. Analyses determined that core temperatures achieved by in-line hydrocoolers during packing did not reduce temperatures sufficiently to ensure good quality retention over the longer periods of time required for container shipping to export markets. The study recommends forced-air cooling to further reduce sweet cherry temperatures in the box before shipping.

Contact: Michael W. Neff
mwneff@ashs.org
703-836-4606
American Society for Horticultural Science

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
ACM IMC 2014
Study: Some online shoppers pay more than others
A new study co-authored by a team of Northeastern University faculty and students has found numerous instances of price steering and discrimination on many popular e-commerce retail and travel websites. That's not necessarily a bad thing, they say -- so long as the companies are transparent.

Contact: Kara Shemin
kara.shemin@neu.edu
617-373-2802
Northeastern University

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Cell
TCGA study improves understanding of genetic drivers of thyroid cancer
An analysis of the genomes of nearly 500 papillary thyroid carcinomas -- the most common form of thyroid cancer -- provided new insights into the roles of frequently mutated cancer genes and other alterations driving disease development. The findings also may help improve diagnosis and treatment. Investigators with The Cancer Genome Atlas project identified new molecular subtypes that will help clinicians determine which tumors are more aggressive and which are more likely to respond to certain treatments.
NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Steven Benowitz
steven.benowitz@nih.gov
301-451-8325
NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Child Psychiatry and Human Development
Bradley Hospital finds sleep difficulties common among toddlers with psychiatric disorders
John Boekamp, Ph.D., clinical director of the Pediatric Partial Hospital Program at Bradley Hospital recently led a study that found sleep difficulties -- particularly problems with falling asleep -- were very common among toddlers and preschool-aged children who were receiving clinical treatment for a wide range of psychiatric disorders. The study, titled 'Sleep Onset and Night Waking Insomnias in Preschoolers with Psychiatric Disorders,' is now published online in the journal Child Psychiatry & Human Development.

Contact: Jill Reuter
jreuter@lifespan.org
401-432-1328
Lifespan

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Wayne State researcher finds key signaling pathway in cause of preeclampsia
A team of researchers led by a Wayne State University School of Medicine associate professor of obstetrics and gynecology has published findings that provide novel insight into the cause of preeclampsia, the leading cause of maternal and infant death worldwide, a discovery that could lead to the development of new therapeutic treatments.

Contact: Julie O'Connor
julie.oconnor@wayne.edu
313-577-8845
Wayne State University - Office of the Vice President for Research

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Appetite
Changes at the grocery store could turn the burden of shopping with children on its head
Avoiding power struggles in the grocery store with children begging for sweets, chips and other junk foods -- and parents often giving in -- could be helped by placing the healthier options at the eye level of children and moving the unhealthy ones out of the way.
Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future, GRACE Communications Foundation

Contact: Barbara Benham
bbenham1@jhu.edu
410-614-6029
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
NASA's Terra satellite shows a more organized Tropical Storm Ana
The strong southwesterly wind shear that has been battering Tropical Storm Ana has abated and has given the storm a chance to re-organize. Ana appeared more rounded on imagery from NASA's Terra satellite as thunderstorms again circled the low-level center.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Medical Care
62 percent of colorectal cancer patients report financial burden from treatment, study finds
Nearly two-thirds of patients treated for colorectal cancer reported some measure of financial burden due to their treatment, according to a new study. The burden was greatest among patients who received chemotherapy.
American Cancer Society

Contact: Nicole Fawcett
nfawcett@umich.edu
734-764-2220
University of Michigan Health System

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Fires in the southern United States
In this image taken by the Aqua satellite of the southern United States actively burning areas as detected by MODIS's thermal bands are outlined in red.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Biomacromolecules
NYU researchers break nano barrier to engineer the first protein microfiber
Researchers have broken new ground in the development of proteins that form specialized fibers used in medicine and nanotechnology. For as long as scientists have been able to create new proteins that are capable of self-assembling into fibers, their work has taken place on the nanoscale. For the first time, this achievement has been realized on the microscale -- a leap of magnitude in size that presents significant new opportunities for using engineered protein fibers.
US Army Research Office, National Science Foundation

Contact: Kathleen Hamilton
kathleen.hamilton@nyu.edu
718-260-3792
New York University Polytechnic School of Engineering

Showing releases 1-25 out of 445.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>